STORIES OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE


HIV/AIDS

What it's like to have HIV in 2014 

Vox takes a deep dive into what its like to live with HIV in today's world

Complications & Consequences of HIV

STIs

The US Government Recruited Black Men to Watch Them Die

Retropod podcast reminds us of how we know some of what we know about syphilis today & the horrors of the Tuskagee syphilis experiment


SARS


Ebola

My dad was the first Liberian doctor to die from Ebola: One daughter's story 

Elizabeth Brisbane and her father Dr. Samual Brisbane's story

Life After Ebola 

West Africa four years after the outbreak, as told in photos


Clostridium Difficile

My C. Diff Story

Rachel and her story with community acquired Clostridium difficile


 
 

Hepatitis

Being infected with Hepatitis B is just like having a fatal disease. Once you are diagnosed with the disease, it is like a death sentence
— Robert P. Idan, a hepatitis patient in Ghana

David Teitel has worked as a cashier at health food stores since the mid-1980s. He enjoys sharing history facts, baseball statistics and arithmetic with customers - he's famous for his numbers knowledge. David has been living with hepatitis C for 39 years and is waiting to be accepted into a new clinical trial. Waiting for treatment, David reflects on his life: his relationship with his parents, his painful adolescence and a period of isolation in his early 20s.

Unexplained Fatigue

William's story with hepatitis


Lyme Disease


Malaria

A Cautionary Tale

The Adisa Family's experience with malaria 


Polio

Once Upon A City: Sweeping polio outbreak hits Toronto

Scott Young tells the story of his son, Canadian musician Neil Young and his experience with polio


Tuberculosis

  Shawn Selway  begins his thorough investigation of the evacuation of 1,274 Inuit and Cree sufferers of tuberculosis from the Eastern Arctic to Mountain Sanatorium in Hamilton, Ontario, from 1950 to 1965. Selway considers not only the political culture, and the systemic racism within that culture, in which the decisions were made, but also the technological and economic changes that made these relocations possible. Selway carefully documents the impact of the evacuations on the Inuit community and has included an assortment of archival images within the book. This is an important look at a difficult time in our country’s history.

Shawn Selway begins his thorough investigation of the evacuation of 1,274 Inuit and Cree sufferers of tuberculosis from the Eastern Arctic to Mountain Sanatorium in Hamilton, Ontario, from 1950 to 1965. Selway considers not only the political culture, and the systemic racism within that culture, in which the decisions were made, but also the technological and economic changes that made these relocations possible. Selway carefully documents the impact of the evacuations on the Inuit community and has included an assortment of archival images within the book. This is an important look at a difficult time in our country’s history.